Posted by: sqlswimmer | May 12, 2015

TSQL2sday #66 – Monitoring

A big thank you to Cathrine Wilhelmsen (blog | twitter) for hosting this month’s TSQL2sday party. Monitoring is this month’s topic and it’s a very important one. It could mean the difference between having a job and looking for a job.

TSQL2sDay150x150When I started working with SQL Server (a long time ago, in a galaxy far far away) there were no commercial monitoring tools available and quite often I would get called or paged (yes, it was a long time ago) in the middle of the night by a very angry boss because there was something “wrong” with the database. Or worse yet, I would get no call at all and show up at work the next morning with a line of angry people waiting for me when I got off the elevator. It only took a couple of these encounters for me to realize that I needed to be much more proactive or change my line of work (I had heard that underwater basket weaving was an easy gig).

I started looking at the reasons I was being called and discovered most of them were things that could easily have been avoided if I had known about them earlier. Things like database and transaction log files filling up, running out of disk space, processes/queries that were taking increasingly longer and longer. Since there were no commercial monitoring tools out there I decided I needed to essentially roll my own.

I had to start looking under the covers to find what I was looking for. This gave me an even greater exposure into how SQL Server worked. Did I mention that this was before Google? I couldn’t just search for easy answers, I had to really dig in the system databases to find what I wanted. This was in fact, one of the best things that could have happened to me so early in my career as a DBA. I was forced to learn how SQL Server worked on my own.

To this day, I still “carry” around my home grown monitoring solution in my toolbox. I have updated it and expanded it through the years to accommodate newer versions and functionality and made it more efficient based on both of those things. Not all shops have the budget for monitoring tools and even if they do, a lot of the time they are only willing to spend that money on production servers, not development or test (don’t get me started, that’s an entirely different blog post).

My little monitoring solution has come in handy over the years because it has afforded me the opportunity to discover what’s under the covers of the newest version/features of SQL Server and provide a no cost basic monitoring solution to my employers when the budget is tight or non-existent. If you don’t have your own monitoring solution I would highly recommend you create one, if for nothing more than the reasons I stated above.

Don’t get me wrong, I love the commercial monitoring tools that I have access to now, but knowing the how and why of SQL Server will only make you a better DBA and could possibly mean the difference between having a job and looking for a job.

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Responses

  1. Hi,
    Thank you for your post. Would it be possible for you to share your homegrown solution?

    Thanks.

    Tim

    • I’d be happy to share, but it’s not quite ready for prime time. Let me create some documentation for it, right now the documentation lives in my head. Give me a few weeks and I should have it ready.

  2. […] Angela Henry (@SQLSwimmer) tells how she became a better DBA by creating her own monitoring solution, and how having a monitoring solution in your toolbox can save you from having to look for a new […]


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